Linda McIntosh 1967

 

Linda McIntosh 1967

Linda McIntosh 1967

Linda McIntosh is the Science Department Head and Curriculum Coordinator and teacher at the Dexter and Southfield Schools. She was a science teacher at Dana for over 30 years. Starting her career in the fall of 1974 she has taught Advanced Placement Biology; Biology; Current Topics in Life Science; Field Exploration in Environmental Science Marine Science; and Quantitative Preparation for Science, Genetics, Evolution, Medicine and Disease.  Linda was the Head of the Dana Science Department from 1999-2003.  She has been the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships and was a H. Dudley Wright fellow at the Wright Center for Education at Tufts University in 1996. This fellowship resulted in the publications of a genetics and social science curriculum, The Deaf of Martha’s Vineyard.

Ms. McIntosh has been a member of the Massachusetts Marine Educators (MME) since 1978 and has served on MME’s Executive Committee since 1987. MME is a dynamic organization of teachers, informal educators, students, and educational institutions whose goal is to develop a marine literate society and promote awareness of the ocean world by integrating marine studies into existing curricula.  MME members develop and share curriculum materials and the organization provides in-service teacher training, workshops and conferences, and facilitates networking among teachers and other educators. In 2004 Ms. McIntosh received the Marine Educator of the Year award from MME.

As biological knowledge and technologies explode, science teachers must work hard to stay current in their disciplines.  Luckily, biology is often at the forefront of the news.  This is what makes science relevant and according to Ms. McIntosh is what “grabs girls’ attention.” Ms. McIntosh and other science educators learn what is necessary to keep up with the rapidly changing curriculum. They hope that their students will acquire a basic biology literacy that will help them as responsible adults to make informed decisions on the complex issues that will affect their lives, such as stem cell research and global warming.

For the 2005 school year, Ms. McIntosh was awarded a Congdon Sabbatical.  She was excited to have the opportunity to complete her independent research on the Brassica butterfly, Pieris rapae.  She continued work that she had done the previous summer at the University of Wisconsin in Madison on examining the butterfly’s response to environmental stress and changes in gravitational force. As the result of her sabbatical, Ms. McIntosh was successful in her goal of creating independent research opportunities for her students.

In addition to teaching, Ms. McIntosh is on the advisory board of Oceans’s First at Tabor Academy; involved in NEU CAPSULE, a program by Northeastern University and the Museum of Science in collaboration with the Boston Public Schools that provides capstone experiences for high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and BioBuilder, an open-access website from MIT offering activities for teachers in synthetic biology; and developed curriculum using MBARI EARTH based on Real Time Data and ocean systems.

 Bibliography
 “The Congdon Sabbitical: Personal and Professional Growth.” Dana Hallmarks X.2 (Winter 2006). Print.
Delude, Cathryn M. “The battles of Bio 101.” Paradigm Magazine. (Fall 2005). MIT, n.d. Web. 19 April 2006. http://www.wi.mit.edu/news/paradigm/index/html.
“Linda McIntosh heads Dana Hall Science Dept.” Press Release. [1999].
McIntosh, Linda. “Interacting with Science.” Dana Hall Bulletin 56.1 (Spring 1995): 8-9. Print.
Linda McIntosh and Members of the Class of 2000. Photograph. Linda McIntosh Biographic File. Nina Heald Webber 1949 Archives, Dana Hall School, Wellesley, MA.
McIntosh. “Re: Info – and thank you!” Message to Pam Kaplan. 25 April 2012
Watson, Barbra. “Wellesley Resident elected as President of Massachusetts Marine Educators.” Press Release: Dana Hall School, 2003.
 Pam Kaplan
Archivist
March 2012
Dana Women in Science Display

 

Leave a Reply